Comox Valley Chiropractor – Tips for your Health

Health tips from your Comox Valley Chiropractor

Routine X-rays Not Needed March 25, 2009

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Following up on my previous post about the necessity of X-rays, I came across a review of the literature for low back imaging.

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In 1994, the AHPR began recommending against imaging of the low back in the early stages of acute low back pain. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the use of immediate X-rays for the low back and the clinical outcome of the case.

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479 articles were identified and reviewed. The authors found no differences in long term and short term outcomes between those who were X-rayed immediately and those who simply received treatment.

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They concluded that for patients who present with simple uncomplicated low back pain (no red flags present), X-raying their back did not lead to any greater improvements. Since there is no benefit to imaging the back, but there are draw backs (radiation exposure, cost), routine imaging should be avoided.

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Ultimately, every clinician has to rationalize their decisions when it comes to the assessment and treatment of their patients. I will often explain my decision not to X-ray with the fact that the X-ray result will not change my clinical management of their case. We know already from previous studies that many things are seen on X-ray and MRI that don’t have clinical relevance and may actually confuse the issue.

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If you would like to read the original article, it can be found here.

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Dr. Debbie Wright is a practicing Comox Valley Chiropractor.

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Healing Elbow Pain March 8, 2009

Golfer's Elbow

Golfer

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Tennis elbow and Golfer’s elbow are the common names for conditions that involve the elbow. Tennis elbow tends to affect the outer elbow, while golfer’s elbow affects the inner elbow. These two spots correspond to where the forearm muscles attach into the elbow – the muscles that extend the wrist on the outside and the muscles that flex the wrist on the inside.

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There are several theories as to why these conditions develop, but the most commonly cited cause is that of overuse. Using the example of tennis, the stress to the forearm muscles of hitting hundreds (if not thousands) of balls leads to small micro-trauma of the muscle attachment point. This causes tiny micro-tears which do not get a chance to properly heal before they are stressed again – a typical repetitive strain injury.

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Symptoms of this condition include pain over the outer or inner elbow, point tenderness over the bone in that area, weakness or soreness of the muscles with use, morning stiffness and in some cases pain or tingling spreading down the arm towards the wrist. A good examination must be done to differentiate this problem from a nerve or joint irritation in the neck that is referring pain to the elbow.

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In my office, I tend to see more of these conditions arising from computer and mouse use as opposed to the traditional sports-related causes. In these cases, I find it is imperative to assess and treat the neck and shoulder as well as the elbow and wrist. Treatment will often involve chiropractic adjustments to the neck, mid-back, shoulder, elbow and wrist. Other good options include soft tissue therapy, kinesiotaping and low intensity laser therapy. I am not a huge fan of splints as they are often over-used and will further weaken the muscles you are trying to rehabilitate. However, there are certain cases where they are helpful.

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Because the offending activity that caused the problem cannot always be stopped (i.e. computer work), a good stretching and strengthening plan is essential. Below you will find some videos of basic forearm stretching, as well as a good mobilization for tennis elbow. The key with any repetitive strain injury is to be able to stretch and relax the muscles on a regular basis. I recommend stretching out the forearms once every 20 minutes when on the computer. It takes less than a minute and can spare you from months of recovery if you let the problem get too big.

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Dr. Debbie Wright is a practicing Comox Valley Chiropractor.

 

Improve Your Golf Game March 1, 2009

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Proper spine flexibility and strength is essential to a good golf game. Increasing either of these variables will more than likely lead to longer drives and strokes off your game. That is why most professional golfers know that chiropractic care is a necessity to keep them healthy and give them a competitive edge.

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In addition to chiropractic care, a proper warm-up and stretching can ensure you have the best day possible out on the course. I regularly refer patients to the Canadian Chiropractic Association‘s golf stretching pamphlet. These quick and easy exercises will help to prepare your body for the increased forces that occur during your game.

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You can download the Golf Stretches pamphlet by clicking on the following link:

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Golf Stretches

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Dr. Debbie Wright is a practicing Comox Valley Chiropractor.